Healthcare

Here's what Medicare Part B Premiums will be in 2022

Medicare Part B premiums usually increase a little each year, and that’s no different in 2020. We break it down for you.

Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris

Published November 25th, 2020

Updated April 22nd, 2022

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways

While Medicare Part A is usually covered, you'll need to pay for Medicare Part B.

Medicare Part B covers important medical visits.

Your Medicare Part B premium cost will depend on your income level.

For many Americans, Medicare premiums are an unavoidable retirement expense. Depending on the coverage you choose, Medicare covers everything from medical appointments to prescription medications. As with any other type of insurance, though, your premiums are likely to increase from one year to the next.

Many retirees find that Medicare Parts A and B are the most essential types of coverage to have. Part A covers hospitalization, while Part B takes care of those all-too-important medical visits. Usually, Part A will be covered, as long as you paid taxes over the years. But you’ll need to pay for Part B, and those premiums aren’t cheap. Even worse, they tend to rise over time. If you’re wondering, “How much does Medicare cost?”, we’re going to break down just how much Medicare Part B premiums will cost in 2022.

How much does Medicare Part B cost in 2022?

For 2022, the cost of Medicare Part B is based on your annual income as reported on your 2021 tax return. The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses income-related monthly adjustment amounts (IRMAA) to apply higher rates to those falling within predetermined income brackets. Those who pay IRMAA receive a notification from the SSA letting them know their income qualifies them for a higher amount.

Individual reported annual income:Filing jointly reported annual income:2021 amount2022 amountIncrease amount
Less than $91,000Less than $182,000$148.50$170.10$21.60
$91,001 - $114,000$182,001 - $228,000$207.90$238.10$30.20
$114,001 - $142,000$228,001 - $284,000$297.00$340.20$43.20
$142,001 - $170,000$284,001 - $340,000$386.10$442.30$56.20
$170,001 - $500,000$340,001 - $750,000$475.20$544.30$69.10
More than $500,000More than $750,000$504.90$578.30$73.40

Your annual deductible will also see a sizable increase in 2022. In 2021, you had to spend $203 to reach the yearly deductible amount. The Medicare Part B deductible rose to $233 in 2022 – a $30 increase. If you’ve retired or had another income-changing event since 2020, you can complete this form to have your Medicare Part B premiums reduced.

Increase of Medicare Part B since 2021

As medical care costs rise from year to year, premiums are adjusted to cover those increases. According to the Center for Medicare Services, the small increases are linked to rising medical costs, along with an expected increase in the intensity of medical care needed. Most people will pay the $170.10 premium, which is deducted from your Social Security payment if you receive one, or billed to you if you don’t.

It’s also notable that the Medicare Part B deductible is increasing by $30 in 2022. That means you’ll need to pay $233 annually before your Medicare coverage kicks in. At that point, 80 percent of the cost of your care will be covered, which means you’ll be responsible for the other 20 percent. But preventive care is fully covered, with no deductible applied, so yearly physicals, bone density tests, certain screenings, vaccinations, and some therapies are available at no charge to you.

Although the Medicare Part B premium 2022 rates are slightly higher than the 2021 rates, it’s a relatively small increase. A private Medicare Supplement Plan could even help offset some of the costs Medicare doesn’t cover, such as dental care, eye exams, and hearing aids, along with the 20 percent out-of-pocket you have to pay once you’ve reached your deductible.

Bottom Line

Retirement can be complicated, but you don’t have to plan alone. Talk to a Certified Financial Planner today for help with Social Security, private and employer-sponsored retirement plans, and Medicare.


Share this advice


Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris has written about finance for entrepreneurs and marketing firms since 2013. She spent nearly a year as a writer for a credit card processing service and has written about finance for numerous marketing firms and entrepreneurs. Her work has appeared on Money Under 30, The Motley Fool, MoneyGeek, E-commerce Insiders, and GoBankingRates.

Healthcare/Medicare

Medicare Basics


Medicare Benefits


Medicare 2022


Applying for Medicare


Medicare Considerations


Medicare Taxes


Healthcare Considerations

Income and expenses charts

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Healthcare

Here's what Medicare Part B Premiums will be in 2022

Medicare Part B premiums usually increase a little each year, and that’s no different in 2020. We break it down for you.

Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris

Published November 25th, 2020

Updated April 22nd, 2022

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways

While Medicare Part A is usually covered, you'll need to pay for Medicare Part B.

Medicare Part B covers important medical visits.

Your Medicare Part B premium cost will depend on your income level.

For many Americans, Medicare premiums are an unavoidable retirement expense. Depending on the coverage you choose, Medicare covers everything from medical appointments to prescription medications. As with any other type of insurance, though, your premiums are likely to increase from one year to the next.

Many retirees find that Medicare Parts A and B are the most essential types of coverage to have. Part A covers hospitalization, while Part B takes care of those all-too-important medical visits. Usually, Part A will be covered, as long as you paid taxes over the years. But you’ll need to pay for Part B, and those premiums aren’t cheap. Even worse, they tend to rise over time. If you’re wondering, “How much does Medicare cost?”, we’re going to break down just how much Medicare Part B premiums will cost in 2022.

How much does Medicare Part B cost in 2022?

For 2022, the cost of Medicare Part B is based on your annual income as reported on your 2021 tax return. The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses income-related monthly adjustment amounts (IRMAA) to apply higher rates to those falling within predetermined income brackets. Those who pay IRMAA receive a notification from the SSA letting them know their income qualifies them for a higher amount.

Individual reported annual income:Filing jointly reported annual income:2021 amount2022 amountIncrease amount
Less than $91,000Less than $182,000$148.50$170.10$21.60
$91,001 - $114,000$182,001 - $228,000$207.90$238.10$30.20
$114,001 - $142,000$228,001 - $284,000$297.00$340.20$43.20
$142,001 - $170,000$284,001 - $340,000$386.10$442.30$56.20
$170,001 - $500,000$340,001 - $750,000$475.20$544.30$69.10
More than $500,000More than $750,000$504.90$578.30$73.40

Your annual deductible will also see a sizable increase in 2022. In 2021, you had to spend $203 to reach the yearly deductible amount. The Medicare Part B deductible rose to $233 in 2022 – a $30 increase. If you’ve retired or had another income-changing event since 2020, you can complete this form to have your Medicare Part B premiums reduced.

Increase of Medicare Part B since 2021

As medical care costs rise from year to year, premiums are adjusted to cover those increases. According to the Center for Medicare Services, the small increases are linked to rising medical costs, along with an expected increase in the intensity of medical care needed. Most people will pay the $170.10 premium, which is deducted from your Social Security payment if you receive one, or billed to you if you don’t.

It’s also notable that the Medicare Part B deductible is increasing by $30 in 2022. That means you’ll need to pay $233 annually before your Medicare coverage kicks in. At that point, 80 percent of the cost of your care will be covered, which means you’ll be responsible for the other 20 percent. But preventive care is fully covered, with no deductible applied, so yearly physicals, bone density tests, certain screenings, vaccinations, and some therapies are available at no charge to you.

Although the Medicare Part B premium 2022 rates are slightly higher than the 2021 rates, it’s a relatively small increase. A private Medicare Supplement Plan could even help offset some of the costs Medicare doesn’t cover, such as dental care, eye exams, and hearing aids, along with the 20 percent out-of-pocket you have to pay once you’ve reached your deductible.

Bottom Line

Retirement can be complicated, but you don’t have to plan alone. Talk to a Certified Financial Planner today for help with Social Security, private and employer-sponsored retirement plans, and Medicare.

Healthcare/Medicare

Medicare Basics


Medicare Benefits


Medicare 2022


Applying for Medicare


Medicare Considerations


Medicare Taxes


Healthcare Considerations


Share this advice


Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris

Stephanie Faris has written about finance for entrepreneurs and marketing firms since 2013. She spent nearly a year as a writer for a credit card processing service and has written about finance for numerous marketing firms and entrepreneurs. Her work has appeared on Money Under 30, The Motley Fool, MoneyGeek, E-commerce Insiders, and GoBankingRates.

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Legal

Retirable, Inc. ('Retirable') is an SEC registered investment advisor. By using this website, you accept our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. Retirable provides holistic retirement planning services, which are available only to residents of the United States. You must be at least 18 years of age to become a Retirable Premium user. Nothing on this website should be considered an offer, solicitation of an offer, or advice to buy or sell securities.

Investing involves risk and past performance is not indicative of future results. Increased spending increases the risk of depleting your savings and performance is not guaranteed. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any decisions based on your own personal circumstances.

For more information, see our Form ADV Part II and other disclosures.

© 2022 Retirable Inc. All rights reserved.

We're accredited and certified by