Lifestyle

10 Best Cities to Retire in Washington in 2022

With no state income tax and relatively low property tax rates, Washington presents a financially attractive picture for cash-conscious retirees. Many of its cities and towns find themselves placed on nationwide lists of the best places to retire, which speaks highly of how well it treats its over-65 population.

annie-sisk

Annie Sisk

Published November 11th, 2022

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways

Washington state is blessed with a number of small to mid-sized cities with excellent access to outdoor recreation activities, including boating, fishing, hiking, and more.

Larger cities such as Spokane and Seattle offer a rich diversity of cultural and artistic events.

Relatively low property tax rates and no state income tax mean your retirement savings will stretch farther in this state.

If you’re looking for a place to retire that offers a tremendous diversity of both terrain and climate, with a varied assortment of opportunities for cultural, historical, and artistic activities to experience, consider the lovely state of Washington. The northwestern corner of the contiguous lower 48 United States features a varied topography, as well as an intriguing mix of large cities, small villages, and everything in between. No matter what your preferred activities, you’ll find it in this beautiful state. Indoor or outdoor, the cities on our list have you covered.

With no state income tax and relatively low property tax rates, Washington presents a financially attractive picture for cash-conscious retirees. Many of its cities and towns find themselves placed on nationwide lists of the best places to retire, which speaks highly of how well it treats its over-65 population.

With so much on offer, who wouldn’t like to retire to Washington? If you’re not a fan of rainy days, the state’s average rainfall of between 40 and 90 inches per year might make you want to consider a southern state with more sunshine. Additionally, some areas of the state are experiencing a growing risk of wildfire. There’s also a risk of a major earthquake within the next 40 years or so, although that’s true of much of the West Coast. Finally, Washington does impose an estate tax on inheritance transfers over $2.193 million (U.S.).

If Washington is sounding good to you, take a look at the following ten cities for your retirement in 2022.

Gig Harbor

CITY POPULATION: 12,181

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 28.9%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 36.9% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $84,861

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above national average

With those stunning Puget Sound vistas and a strong community commitment to outdoor recreation, Gig Harbor provides a well-supported retirement life for folks over 65, who make up over a quarter of all residents.

The waterfront is a big part of the downtown area, providing lots of walkable paths with picture-perfect views. There’s no shortage of quaint outdoor cafes and patioed restaurants for dining out and plenty of small locally-owned shops to patronize for gifts, books, art, and more. Explore the Harbor History Museum to learn more about the area’s seagoing past and present.

Gig Harbor might have a slightly higher tax burden compared to other locations in Washington but that’s offset by the absence of state income tax. You’ll also appreciate the prevalence of medical centers in the area, the largest per capita number in the state.

Snohomish

CITY POPULATION: 10,154

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 17%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 31.3% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $70,234

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Below national average

Snohomish is a small city located about 40 miles northeast of Seattle. With plenty of recreation and medical centers catering to its residents, together with a relatively good local property tax rate, Snohomish is a great place to spend your post-work days. Its small town vibe offers plenty of peaceful, laid-back relaxation but with Seattle less than an hour’s drive away, you can also enjoy all that a large, world-class city has to offer, including fine dining, shopping, and live entertainment, as well as cultural and other educational experiences to explore.

You’ll enjoy the close access to top-quality medical care in Snohomish, including the University of Washington Medical Centers as well as many other healthcare facilities and providers. The weather stays on the cool but seasonable side, with an average high in August of 77°F and a low of 37°F in December. Don’t expect a lot of snow in Snohomish as it gets only an average of 3.5 inches per year.

Spokane

CITY POPULATION: 229,071

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 15.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 7.7% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $52,600

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above national average

The largest Washington city on our list, Spokane is second only to Seattle for population size. It’s located on the eastern border of the state, just a handful of miles from its border with Idaho. Riverfront Park offers great access to the Spokane River and its scenic views for outdoor enthusiasts, including the not-to-be-missed Spokane Falls. You can also explore the botanical gardens at John A. Finch Arboretum—but watch out for the wildlife, including moose.

You’ll never run out of things to do, from touring historic hotels to browsing the city’s museums. Spokane’s downtown section is vibrant and enchanting, with shops, sidewalk cafes, and diverse shopping opportunities. Spokane gets about 44 inches of snowfall each year, with a temperature range between 26°F and 88°F. Expect about 17 inches of rain annually in Spokane. Four major hospitals serve the community, as well as a number of specialist and general practice medical centers.

Yakima

CITY POPULATION: 96,578

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 15%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 7% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $48,220

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above national average

Located in central Washington’s Yakima Valley, Yakima is known for its nearby wineries and fruit orchards as well as a diverse array of fun festivals and events like the Central Washington State Fair, held annually in late September. Catch a minor league football or American Legion baseball game, or take in the exhibits at the Yakima Valley Museum to learn more about the area’s history. Art galleries and the Yakama Nation Cultural Museum round out the city’s cultural offerings.

Take in a live performance at one of the area’s venues, such as Capitol Theatre or Seasons Performance Hall. Outdoor enthusiasts will find much to love and learn about at the Yakima Area Arboretum’s botanical garden. Medical care is accessible, with two hospitals in the community in addition to other healthcare centers and providers. Yakima’s weather is fairly seasonable, with about 18 inches of snowfall and 9 inches of rain on average each year.

Olympia

CITY POPULATION: 55,919

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 18.4%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 6.1% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $63,185

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below national average

The capital of Washington state is located on the southern edge of Puget Sound and embraces public recreation with an impressive assortment of conservation areas, nature preserves, public parks and recreation centers. With all that access to the great outdoors, it’s no surprise you’ll find plenty of places to walk and explore, including the Governor’s Mansion and the capitol campus, which also includes a lovely floral garden and several historic buildings that architecture fans will appreciate.

On an annual basis, Olympia is a good bit rainier than some other cities on our list, with about 53 inches of rain and six inches of snow each year. The temperatures are a bit milder, too, with an average July high of 77°F and a winter low of 34°F.

Port Orchard

CITY POPULATION: 15,979

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 14.3%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 14% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $71,719

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below national average

Just west across the Puget Sound from Seattle lies the Kitsap Peninsula, which is where you’ll find the charming small town of Port Orchard. The cost of living for this area is 14% higher than the national average, but if it fits your budget, Port Orchard will reward you with some priceless mountain and water views and truly unique things to do. Its waterfront community is vibrant and active, so if you love boating, you’ll find lots to love here. Plenty of access to parks such as Manchester State Park, museums, local produce markets, delicious food at bistros and restaurants, and fun attractions like the Hobbit House will keep you busy.

Port Orchard offers fairly mild temperatures, from a high of 77 degrees Fahrenheit in July and August to an average low of 37 in December and January. Rainfall occurs year-round, with the wettest month on average being November at a little under eight inches for the month.

Wenatchee

CITY POPULATION: 35,405

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 16.1%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 0.8% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $56,962

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: About par with national average

Named one of the top 25 places to retire in the nation by Forbes Magazine in 2017, Wenatchee also proudly claims another title: the Apple Capital of the World. Located on the scenic Columbia River near the Cascade Mountains, Wenatchee offers a high doctor-to-resident ratio, tons of access to walkable trails, and not nearly as much rain as some other Washington towns. Wenatchee is also committed to support of the arts with the Art on the Avenues, an 85-piece sculpture project that you can stroll through and enjoy.

With an average high temperature of 89 degrees in July, Wenatchee’s hot summers let you get outside and enjoy all that its geographical features have to offer, including river-based activities and outdoor recreation in the town’s parks and greenspaces. Expect lots of snow—about 16 inches annually, on average—and colder temperatures in the winter months, with average lows that dip into the mid-twenties during December and January.

Longview

CITY POPULATION: 37,824

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 21.1%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 3.6% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $48,028

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above than national average

In southwest Washington, where the Cowlitz and Columbia rivers meet, Longview is the central home of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe. Today it hosts a number of historic buildings, most of which were built in the early 20th century during the town’s first growth spurt. Longview has steadily grown in population with each census since its founding. With a significant retiree population and a cost of living below the national average, Longview is a popular choice for folks who enjoy Washington’s climate and access to the great outdoors.

Longview gets much less snow annually than some other cities on our top ten list, with an average of about four inches per year, although the adjacent foothills can get much more. Expect about 183 days a year of rainfall or other precipitation, and milder temperatures overall, with an average August high of 79 degrees and an average low in January of 34 degrees.

Port Townsend

CITY POPULATION: 10,306

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 34.2%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 15.4% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $52,690

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below than national average

With a vital and thoroughly charming downtown area and plenty of sweet Victorian architecture to appreciate, Port Townsend boasts a busy schedule of annual festivals (like the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival) and cultural events plus a thriving independent boatbuilding and maritime community.

History and military buffs will enjoy exploring Fort Worden Historical State Park and the Coast Artillery Museum. Pack a picnic lunch and make an afternoon of it along the shoreline of Admiralty Inlet at Chetzemoka Park, or hunt for seashells at North Beach Park. Whatever you like to do, you’ll find it in or near this picturesque waterfront town.

Port Townsend enjoys a mild climate, with an average summertime high of 73 degrees and an average low for December through February of 38 degrees. Snowfall tends to be light—only a couple of inches per year on average—and, thanks to its positioning within the Olympic Rain Shadow, remains significantly drier than other nearby WA locations.

Sequim

CITY POPULATION: 8,241

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 34%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 10.8% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $39,509

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below national average

First, the pronunciation: It’s “skwim,” not “see-kwim.” The name originated in the language of the indigenous Klallam people, part of the Coast Salish language family. Well known for its commercial lavender farming, it’s rivaled in lavender production only by similar areas in France. If you like Dungeness crab, this is also a good place for you.

As a very small town, Sequim’s attractions and cultural offerings might not be quite as diverse as what you’d find in much larger areas, but if you love spending time outdoors, Sequim is your paradise. Enjoy long forest walks, golfing, biking, and both fresh and saltwater fishing. Yet you’ll find a significant population of fellow retirees plus lots of medical centers, recreation centers, and retirement communities.

If you like cool breezes, dense green forests, and foggy mornings, you’ll enjoy living in Sequim. Located below the Olympic Mountains on the banks of the Dungeness River, Sequim gets little rain on an annual basis, thanks to its positioning within the Olympic Rain Shadow.

Which City Should You Retire In?

To find the best Washington city for your retirement, sketch out your preferences and needs. If healthcare is a concern for you, look for towns and cities with greater concentrations of medical providers and centers, such as Gig Harbor. If access to a wide variety of cultural offerings and big-city events is important to you and your family, look for towns within driving distance of Seattle or Spokane.

Outdoor enthusiasts can’t really go wrong with any city on our list. The right choice is really more a question of what type of activities you prefer. Look for waterfront towns if boating and saltwater access are crucial for you.

Finally, if you’d prefer to be well out of the infamous Pacific Northwest rain band, look for cities that lie within the Olympic Rain Shadow to stay dry.

Final Thoughts

Consider your retirement plan when you make your decision as to where you should retire. Cost of living, tax treatment, and other financial factors should always be weighed and evaluated when making this important choice. If you’re not sure you have enough saved or will be able to produce enough income from investments to support your lifestyle, it’s not too late to start now. Drop us a line and we’ll create or refine your retirement plan together.


Share this advice


Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk is a freelance writer and content strategist. Originally from North Carolina, Annie now lives in Binghamton, New York. She's written extensively for finance, legal, and human resources sites and publications, including Legal Beagle and Predictive Index.

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Lifestyle

10 Best Cities to Retire in Washington in 2022

With no state income tax and relatively low property tax rates, Washington presents a financially attractive picture for cash-conscious retirees. Many of its cities and towns find themselves placed on nationwide lists of the best places to retire, which speaks highly of how well it treats its over-65 population.

annie-sisk

Annie Sisk

Published November 11th, 2022

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways

Washington state is blessed with a number of small to mid-sized cities with excellent access to outdoor recreation activities, including boating, fishing, hiking, and more.

Larger cities such as Spokane and Seattle offer a rich diversity of cultural and artistic events.

Relatively low property tax rates and no state income tax mean your retirement savings will stretch farther in this state.

If you’re looking for a place to retire that offers a tremendous diversity of both terrain and climate, with a varied assortment of opportunities for cultural, historical, and artistic activities to experience, consider the lovely state of Washington. The northwestern corner of the contiguous lower 48 United States features a varied topography, as well as an intriguing mix of large cities, small villages, and everything in between. No matter what your preferred activities, you’ll find it in this beautiful state. Indoor or outdoor, the cities on our list have you covered.

With no state income tax and relatively low property tax rates, Washington presents a financially attractive picture for cash-conscious retirees. Many of its cities and towns find themselves placed on nationwide lists of the best places to retire, which speaks highly of how well it treats its over-65 population.

With so much on offer, who wouldn’t like to retire to Washington? If you’re not a fan of rainy days, the state’s average rainfall of between 40 and 90 inches per year might make you want to consider a southern state with more sunshine. Additionally, some areas of the state are experiencing a growing risk of wildfire. There’s also a risk of a major earthquake within the next 40 years or so, although that’s true of much of the West Coast. Finally, Washington does impose an estate tax on inheritance transfers over $2.193 million (U.S.).

If Washington is sounding good to you, take a look at the following ten cities for your retirement in 2022.

Gig Harbor

CITY POPULATION: 12,181

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 28.9%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 36.9% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $84,861

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above national average

With those stunning Puget Sound vistas and a strong community commitment to outdoor recreation, Gig Harbor provides a well-supported retirement life for folks over 65, who make up over a quarter of all residents.

The waterfront is a big part of the downtown area, providing lots of walkable paths with picture-perfect views. There’s no shortage of quaint outdoor cafes and patioed restaurants for dining out and plenty of small locally-owned shops to patronize for gifts, books, art, and more. Explore the Harbor History Museum to learn more about the area’s seagoing past and present.

Gig Harbor might have a slightly higher tax burden compared to other locations in Washington but that’s offset by the absence of state income tax. You’ll also appreciate the prevalence of medical centers in the area, the largest per capita number in the state.

Snohomish

CITY POPULATION: 10,154

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 17%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 31.3% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $70,234

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Below national average

Snohomish is a small city located about 40 miles northeast of Seattle. With plenty of recreation and medical centers catering to its residents, together with a relatively good local property tax rate, Snohomish is a great place to spend your post-work days. Its small town vibe offers plenty of peaceful, laid-back relaxation but with Seattle less than an hour’s drive away, you can also enjoy all that a large, world-class city has to offer, including fine dining, shopping, and live entertainment, as well as cultural and other educational experiences to explore.

You’ll enjoy the close access to top-quality medical care in Snohomish, including the University of Washington Medical Centers as well as many other healthcare facilities and providers. The weather stays on the cool but seasonable side, with an average high in August of 77°F and a low of 37°F in December. Don’t expect a lot of snow in Snohomish as it gets only an average of 3.5 inches per year.

Spokane

CITY POPULATION: 229,071

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 15.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 7.7% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $52,600

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above national average

The largest Washington city on our list, Spokane is second only to Seattle for population size. It’s located on the eastern border of the state, just a handful of miles from its border with Idaho. Riverfront Park offers great access to the Spokane River and its scenic views for outdoor enthusiasts, including the not-to-be-missed Spokane Falls. You can also explore the botanical gardens at John A. Finch Arboretum—but watch out for the wildlife, including moose.

You’ll never run out of things to do, from touring historic hotels to browsing the city’s museums. Spokane’s downtown section is vibrant and enchanting, with shops, sidewalk cafes, and diverse shopping opportunities. Spokane gets about 44 inches of snowfall each year, with a temperature range between 26°F and 88°F. Expect about 17 inches of rain annually in Spokane. Four major hospitals serve the community, as well as a number of specialist and general practice medical centers.

Yakima

CITY POPULATION: 96,578

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 15%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 7% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $48,220

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above national average

Located in central Washington’s Yakima Valley, Yakima is known for its nearby wineries and fruit orchards as well as a diverse array of fun festivals and events like the Central Washington State Fair, held annually in late September. Catch a minor league football or American Legion baseball game, or take in the exhibits at the Yakima Valley Museum to learn more about the area’s history. Art galleries and the Yakama Nation Cultural Museum round out the city’s cultural offerings.

Take in a live performance at one of the area’s venues, such as Capitol Theatre or Seasons Performance Hall. Outdoor enthusiasts will find much to love and learn about at the Yakima Area Arboretum’s botanical garden. Medical care is accessible, with two hospitals in the community in addition to other healthcare centers and providers. Yakima’s weather is fairly seasonable, with about 18 inches of snowfall and 9 inches of rain on average each year.

Olympia

CITY POPULATION: 55,919

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 18.4%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 6.1% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $63,185

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below national average

The capital of Washington state is located on the southern edge of Puget Sound and embraces public recreation with an impressive assortment of conservation areas, nature preserves, public parks and recreation centers. With all that access to the great outdoors, it’s no surprise you’ll find plenty of places to walk and explore, including the Governor’s Mansion and the capitol campus, which also includes a lovely floral garden and several historic buildings that architecture fans will appreciate.

On an annual basis, Olympia is a good bit rainier than some other cities on our list, with about 53 inches of rain and six inches of snow each year. The temperatures are a bit milder, too, with an average July high of 77°F and a winter low of 34°F.

Port Orchard

CITY POPULATION: 15,979

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 14.3%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 14% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $71,719

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below national average

Just west across the Puget Sound from Seattle lies the Kitsap Peninsula, which is where you’ll find the charming small town of Port Orchard. The cost of living for this area is 14% higher than the national average, but if it fits your budget, Port Orchard will reward you with some priceless mountain and water views and truly unique things to do. Its waterfront community is vibrant and active, so if you love boating, you’ll find lots to love here. Plenty of access to parks such as Manchester State Park, museums, local produce markets, delicious food at bistros and restaurants, and fun attractions like the Hobbit House will keep you busy.

Port Orchard offers fairly mild temperatures, from a high of 77 degrees Fahrenheit in July and August to an average low of 37 in December and January. Rainfall occurs year-round, with the wettest month on average being November at a little under eight inches for the month.

Wenatchee

CITY POPULATION: 35,405

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 16.1%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 0.8% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $56,962

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: About par with national average

Named one of the top 25 places to retire in the nation by Forbes Magazine in 2017, Wenatchee also proudly claims another title: the Apple Capital of the World. Located on the scenic Columbia River near the Cascade Mountains, Wenatchee offers a high doctor-to-resident ratio, tons of access to walkable trails, and not nearly as much rain as some other Washington towns. Wenatchee is also committed to support of the arts with the Art on the Avenues, an 85-piece sculpture project that you can stroll through and enjoy.

With an average high temperature of 89 degrees in July, Wenatchee’s hot summers let you get outside and enjoy all that its geographical features have to offer, including river-based activities and outdoor recreation in the town’s parks and greenspaces. Expect lots of snow—about 16 inches annually, on average—and colder temperatures in the winter months, with average lows that dip into the mid-twenties during December and January.

Longview

CITY POPULATION: 37,824

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 21.1%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 3.6% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $48,028

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly above than national average

In southwest Washington, where the Cowlitz and Columbia rivers meet, Longview is the central home of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe. Today it hosts a number of historic buildings, most of which were built in the early 20th century during the town’s first growth spurt. Longview has steadily grown in population with each census since its founding. With a significant retiree population and a cost of living below the national average, Longview is a popular choice for folks who enjoy Washington’s climate and access to the great outdoors.

Longview gets much less snow annually than some other cities on our top ten list, with an average of about four inches per year, although the adjacent foothills can get much more. Expect about 183 days a year of rainfall or other precipitation, and milder temperatures overall, with an average August high of 79 degrees and an average low in January of 34 degrees.

Port Townsend

CITY POPULATION: 10,306

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 34.2%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 15.4% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $52,690

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below than national average

With a vital and thoroughly charming downtown area and plenty of sweet Victorian architecture to appreciate, Port Townsend boasts a busy schedule of annual festivals (like the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival) and cultural events plus a thriving independent boatbuilding and maritime community.

History and military buffs will enjoy exploring Fort Worden Historical State Park and the Coast Artillery Museum. Pack a picnic lunch and make an afternoon of it along the shoreline of Admiralty Inlet at Chetzemoka Park, or hunt for seashells at North Beach Park. Whatever you like to do, you’ll find it in or near this picturesque waterfront town.

Port Townsend enjoys a mild climate, with an average summertime high of 73 degrees and an average low for December through February of 38 degrees. Snowfall tends to be light—only a couple of inches per year on average—and, thanks to its positioning within the Olympic Rain Shadow, remains significantly drier than other nearby WA locations.

Sequim

CITY POPULATION: 8,241

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 34%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 10.8% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $39,509

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Slightly below national average

First, the pronunciation: It’s “skwim,” not “see-kwim.” The name originated in the language of the indigenous Klallam people, part of the Coast Salish language family. Well known for its commercial lavender farming, it’s rivaled in lavender production only by similar areas in France. If you like Dungeness crab, this is also a good place for you.

As a very small town, Sequim’s attractions and cultural offerings might not be quite as diverse as what you’d find in much larger areas, but if you love spending time outdoors, Sequim is your paradise. Enjoy long forest walks, golfing, biking, and both fresh and saltwater fishing. Yet you’ll find a significant population of fellow retirees plus lots of medical centers, recreation centers, and retirement communities.

If you like cool breezes, dense green forests, and foggy mornings, you’ll enjoy living in Sequim. Located below the Olympic Mountains on the banks of the Dungeness River, Sequim gets little rain on an annual basis, thanks to its positioning within the Olympic Rain Shadow.

Which City Should You Retire In?

To find the best Washington city for your retirement, sketch out your preferences and needs. If healthcare is a concern for you, look for towns and cities with greater concentrations of medical providers and centers, such as Gig Harbor. If access to a wide variety of cultural offerings and big-city events is important to you and your family, look for towns within driving distance of Seattle or Spokane.

Outdoor enthusiasts can’t really go wrong with any city on our list. The right choice is really more a question of what type of activities you prefer. Look for waterfront towns if boating and saltwater access are crucial for you.

Finally, if you’d prefer to be well out of the infamous Pacific Northwest rain band, look for cities that lie within the Olympic Rain Shadow to stay dry.

Final Thoughts

Consider your retirement plan when you make your decision as to where you should retire. Cost of living, tax treatment, and other financial factors should always be weighed and evaluated when making this important choice. If you’re not sure you have enough saved or will be able to produce enough income from investments to support your lifestyle, it’s not too late to start now. Drop us a line and we’ll create or refine your retirement plan together.


Share this advice


Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk is a freelance writer and content strategist. Originally from North Carolina, Annie now lives in Binghamton, New York. She's written extensively for finance, legal, and human resources sites and publications, including Legal Beagle and Predictive Index.

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Retirable, Inc. ('Retirable') is an SEC registered investment advisor. By using this website, you accept our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. Retirable provides holistic retirement planning services, which are available only to residents of the United States. You must be at least 18 years of age to become a Retirable Premium user. Nothing on this website should be considered an offer, solicitation of an offer, or advice to buy or sell securities.

Investing involves risk and past performance is not indicative of future results. Increased spending increases the risk of depleting your savings and performance is not guaranteed. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any decisions based on your own personal circumstances.

For more information, see our Form ADV Part II and other disclosures.

© 2022 Retirable Inc. All rights reserved.

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Legal

Retirable, Inc. ('Retirable') is an SEC registered investment advisor. By using this website, you accept our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. Retirable provides holistic retirement planning services, which are available only to residents of the United States. You must be at least 18 years of age to become a Retirable Premium user. Nothing on this website should be considered an offer, solicitation of an offer, or advice to buy or sell securities.

Investing involves risk and past performance is not indicative of future results. Increased spending increases the risk of depleting your savings and performance is not guaranteed. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any decisions based on your own personal circumstances.

For more information, see our Form ADV Part II and other disclosures.

© 2022 Retirable Inc. All rights reserved.

We're accredited and certified by