Lifestyle

10 Best Cities to Retire in New Hampshire in 2022

Situated snugly between Vermont and Maine, close to the U.S./Canada border, the Granite State is home to about 1.3 million people. That makes it a small state, but one with a dizzying array of benefits for new residents of all ages.

annie-sisk

Annie Sisk

Published August 25th, 2022

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways

One of the original thirteen colonies, New Hampshire is proud of its role in our country’s past, so if you’re interested in American history, this is the state for you.

While you won’t find any large cities within the state, there are some vibrant mid-sized towns, and world-class Boston is fairly accessible, especially if you live in the southeastern corner of New Hampshire.

In addition to its stunning physical beauty, New Hampshire offers one of the most retirement-friendly tax schemes—no personal income, sales, estate, or inheritance taxes levied at the state level.

Situated snugly between Vermont and Maine, close to the U.S./Canada border, the Granite State is home to about 1.3 million people. That makes it a small state, but one with a dizzying array of benefits for new residents of all ages. One of the most remarkable aspects of New Hampshire is its still-vivid history. As one of the first 13 colonies that eventually broke from England to form the United States, New Hampshire’s place in American history is unmistakable.

It’s also an incredibly beautiful state, with breathtaking mountains to dense forests and even a small sliver of Atlantic coastline, all offering quintessentially gorgeous New England views. Choose from tiny villages to busy cities and everything in between.

New Hampshire has no personal income tax, so your pension, retirement account, and Social Security income will not be taxed at that level. You’ll also appreciate the lack of sales, estate, and inheritance tax assessments. However, much of the state is experiencing costs of living that are higher than the national average across the board in all major sectors, from housing to food.

While conditions can and do fluctuate frequently, retirees choosing to move to one of these cities in New Hampshire should be prepared to spend more for the basics and make sure that their retirement savings are sufficient to meet their needs there.

The weather can also be a deterrent for some retirees who are thinking of relocating to New Hampshire. The state gets an average of about 70 inches of snow each year, with average temperatures ranging from about 20 degrees to 80 degrees, depending on the season. If you enjoy seasonable weather and would love witnessing some of the most impressive autumn foliage around, consider the following top cities to retire to in New Hampshire.

Rochester

CITY POPULATION: 32,869

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 18,7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 6.5% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $66,831

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Located right on the border between New Hampshire and Maine, the city of Rochester is one of the fastest growing cities in the state. Part of the Pennacook tribe once called Rochester home, where they grew pumpkins, squash, maize, and beans, as well as hunted and fished for sustenance along the Cocheco River. Today it’s the very vision of a quaint New England town, with an opera house that dates back to the early 20th century and still hosts performances for residents and guests.

Rochester is perfect for retirees who enjoy outdoor activities. You can explore the area beaches at the Grandview Campground, hike the surrounding trails, or fish or swim in the lake there. There’s also a fine art museum, with an impressive contemporary collection to explore, and many folks enjoy the “pick your own” produce at Butternut Farm.

Rochester doesn’t have a lot of hospitals within driving distance, unfortunately; just three are located within 25 miles. On the other hand, it does have a significant community of retirees. You can find nine senior living communities in the area, as well as six assisted living facilities. As for public transportation, Rochester offers bus service and not much more. However, it’s fairly close to Boston, Massachusetts where you can access almost every major form of transportation including three Amtrak stations and a large international airport.

Laconia

CITY POPULATION: 17,025

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 21.9%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 7.5% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $55,814

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Laconia’s jaw-dropping beauty is evident in its open-year-round lakes and beaches. That makes sense, because Laconia is positioned between two lovely lakes, Winnipesaukee and Winnisquam. Whether you’re more interested in fishing, swimming, or just walking along the water’s edge, you’ll love Laconia’s outdoor areas. If you’re more into indoor pursuits, check out the Laconia Antique Center.

Do be aware that the town also hosts an annual motorcycle rally (and has done since the early 20th century), so the ambient noise levels rise significantly every June. Laconia also hosts two sports teams, the New Hampshire Fighting Spirit hockey team and the Winnipesaukee Muskrats baseball team.

Keene

CITY POPULATION: 23,106

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 18,1%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 12.1% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $57,393

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Located in the southern part of the state, Keene is another great choice for those who appreciate and enjoy typical outdoor activities. From hiking to swimming and more, Keene offers a number of nearby facilities, including nature preserves, public parks, and even Green Mountain National Forest. Keene also plays host to an annual music festival for music enthusiasts. You can also people-watch and enjoy the afternoon at Central Square or catch a movie or live performance at the stunning old-school Colonial Theater.

When the family comes to visit, take them to one of the area’s local art galleries or museums. Kids also enjoy Cheshire Children's Museum and, particularly, the working Stonewall Farm. Especially of note to younger visitors are the farm’s animals, including chickens, rabbits, goats, and even draft horses. With such a variety of fun and educational activities, the grandkids will definitely find something to love, and so will you.

Hanover

CITY POPULATION: 11,721

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 15.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 40.5% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $105,446

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

A very small town on the banks of the scenic Connecticut River, right next to the state’s border with Vermont, Hanover offers the laid back, slower pace of life that many retirees crave after decades of a fast-paced career and lifestyle. If you’re dreaming of a tight-knit community with access to top-tier outdoor activities, such as the Appalachian Trail, Hanover might be a good fit for you.

It’s important to note that Hanover has highest cost of living of the towns and cities on our list, according to the most recent available data. However, it’s also an ideal college town, hosting Dartmouth College, a well-known Ivy League school. Enjoy the lovely campus grounds and beautiful historic buildings there. Then visit the Hood Museum of Art, free of charge, or Hopkins Center for the Arts for live performances and movies. Or check out the Nugget Theater, a fun four-screen complex that’s quite popular in the community. Hanover also boasts some wonderful restaurants and cafes, including Jesse’s Steak and Seafood.

Concord

CITY POPULATION: 44,006

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 17.6%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 4.2% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $ 70,004

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

A small city, but larger than most of the other towns on our list, Concord sits in the central southern part of the state, yet is only about an hour’s drive from the Atlantic Ocean. As the capital of New Hampshire, Concord offers an impressive array of activities to keep retirees busy and involved in community life, while still being small enough to offer a small-town vibe.

In season, you can pick apples at Carter Hill Orchard, which has existed in one form or another since the 18th century. Explore the historic home of the 14th U.S. President, Franklin Pierce, and then visit his grave in Old North Cemetery. Don’t miss a visit to the Mc-Aulife-Shepard Discovery Center, honoring two local astronauts, teacher Christa McAuliffe and Alan Shepard, the first American in space.

You’ll enjoy a lower than average cost of living here in Concord, making it one of the more affordable cities in New Hampshire for retirement. as well as access to several top quality medical providers and hospitals.

Portsmouth

CITY POPULATION: 22,277

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 19.4%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 27.6% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $78,712

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Situated at the edge of the Piscataqua River, Portsmouth is a popular and highly walkable spot for tourists and residents alike, especially in the warm, bright summer months. If you’re into history, you can enjoy exploring the town’s historic seaport as well as ten separate museums established in former private homes and mansions.

Fans of the performing arts should keep up with the scheduled performances at The Music Hall, which opened in 1878 and features musical, theatrical, and dance performances, as well as occasional movies. Portsmouth is also home to at least three theatrical groups, as well as the Prescott Park Arts Festival in the town’s waterfront park. Outdoor enthusiasts will always find something to do in Portsmouth, from the area’s beaches (some of which are routinely named as among the cleanest in the country) to many local and state parks that offer fishing, swimming, hiking, and more.

With dozens of hospitals, medical centers, and specialty care clinics in or near Portsmouth, you can be assured of receiving excellent medical care. The closest airport is only two miles from the town, and there’s an Amtrak station in town, so family visits are fairly accessible.

Exeter

CITY POPULATION: 16,114

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 23.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 15% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $73,109

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Founded in 1638, Exeter is positioned in the southern tip of New Hampshire where the Exeter River turns into Squamscott River. It routinely makes the cut in top 30 to 50 lists for best places to retire in the U.S.

Many retirees enjoy the history Exeter showcases for visitors and residents, including the Congregational Church in Exeter, which was founded the same year as the town. Explore the town’s history in more detail through the Exeter Historical Society’s Museum as well as the American Independence Museum, which highlights the area’s role in the American Revolutionary War. If you prefer the great outdoors, check out the fishing at Brickyard Pond Park, which is managed by the town’s Parks and Recreation Department, or play a round of golf at one of the oldest courses in the U.S., the Exeter Country Club. Check out the art exhibits in various media at the Art Up Front Street Studios and Gallery, or sign up for a class in one of the gallery’s workshops. And at the end of a busy day of exploring this charming, quaint town, people of all ages enjoy the halotherapy at Soleil’s Salt Caves.

There are a number of airports within a short distance from Exeter, from Portsmouth Pease (nine miles away) to Boston (43 miles away). In addition, Amtrak’s Downeaster train, which runs from Portland Maine to Boston, stops at Exeter’s platform as the midpoint in the journey. Exeter also boasts plenty of hospitals and medical care centers, as well as a plethora of civic and recreational centers.

Bethlehem

CITY POPULATION: 2,484

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 13.4%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 11.8% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $49,329

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Located in the lovely White Mountains of western New Hampshire, Bethlehem is one of the smaller towns on our list, but its scenery and topography mean it’s one of the most beautiful. What it lacks in some of the more vibrant cultural opportunities of a larger city, it makes up for in its unparalleled scenic beauty and access to outdoor activities. Even so, Bethlehem is home to an active art and music community. The Colonial Theatre showcases independent films, and you’ll find more than one local art gallery that’s friendly to new artists.

The town offers free access to both tennis and basketball courts, and golfers will love the 18-hole Maplewood Golf Course. If winter sports are more your thing, you’ll enjoy Bethlehem’s easy access to snowmobiling trails and cross-country skiing opportunities; with an average of 86 inches of snow a year, you’ll be able to enjoy your favorite activities several days a year. When your family and grandkids come to visit at the holidays, take them to one of the two area holiday tree farms to find and cut down your own live tree. You can also dig into the town’s history through the Bethlehem Heritage Society and its programs.

Berlin

CITY POPULATION: 9,704

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 17.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 27.1% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $39,091

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Situated along the Androscoggin River and within the Great North Woods Region, Berlin is the northernmost town in New Hampshire and includes the village of Cascade. Don’t be surprised to hear its local residents speak a variation of French, locally referred to as “Berlin French,” as Berlin is quite close to the U.S. border with Canada.

For its relatively small population size, Berlin has a surprisingly diverse set of benefits to offer retirees and their guests. Enjoy Jericho Lake ATV Park or go rafting down the river with experienced guides from North Woods Rafting. You’ll find lots of guide and rental companies to help equip you for a diverse array of White Mountains activities, from snowshoeing to snow tubing and more.

History buffs may appreciate the stunning architecture and art in St. Anne’s, a century-old Roman Catholic church located in downtown Berlin. Another great experience you may enjoy is exploring the Berlin Local Works Farmers’ Market held every Thursday afternoon and evening, including a community garden, demonstration kitchen, and live music performances. Or pick up a class (or volunteer to each one) at Wren Works Maker Studio.

Gilford

CITY POPULATION: 7,804

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 20.5%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 3% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $91,902

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Another small town with a coffee-shop vibe that’s relaxing and energetic at the same time, Gilford is a nature lover’s dream. Enjoy a full spectrum of outdoor sports and activities, from summertime swimming and boating to winter skiing and ice fishing. Located on the banks of Lake Winnipesaukee, Gilford is also blessed with a truly spectacular autumnal array of foliage, but never seems overwhelmed with tourists chasing the changing leaves. Enjoy live music performances at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion, which is an outdoor concert venue that’s open seasonally, weather permitting. An old-fashioned general store and a few historic sites located within Gilford are all worth checking out, as is the Pepi Hermann Crystal Gallery and Museum.

Which City Should You Retire In?

New Hampshire is a state of surprising diversity, though most of the towns that made our list are closer to the small-village end of the size spectrum. For people who are looking for a somewhat more relaxed, laid-back lifestyle with a slower pace, there are a lot of options to consider. The exact location that’s perfect for your needs after retirement will depend a lot on your personal preferences. Do you prefer a slightly larger city vibe? Check out Concord, if so. On the other hand, if you’re more interested in a small village surrounded by mountains and lots of opportunities to get outdoors, take a closer look at Bethlehem. Or if it’s the ocean you crave, you’ll want to explore Portsmouth.

Final Thoughts

Another factor that should weigh heavily in your ultimate decision on where to live during your retirement is your overall retirement plan. What you have saved, in what investment vehicles you’ve placed those savings, and how you anticipate drawing income from those funds will all affect your standard of living and so many decisions about where you can or should move. If you haven’t started creating your retirement plan yet, give us a call so we can create it together.


Share this advice


Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk is a freelance writer and content strategist. Originally from North Carolina, Annie now lives in Binghamton, New York. She's written extensively for finance, legal, and human resources sites and publications, including Legal Beagle and Predictive Index.

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Lifestyle

10 Best Cities to Retire in New Hampshire in 2022

Situated snugly between Vermont and Maine, close to the U.S./Canada border, the Granite State is home to about 1.3 million people. That makes it a small state, but one with a dizzying array of benefits for new residents of all ages.

annie-sisk

Annie Sisk

Published August 25th, 2022

Table of Contents

Key Takeaways

One of the original thirteen colonies, New Hampshire is proud of its role in our country’s past, so if you’re interested in American history, this is the state for you.

While you won’t find any large cities within the state, there are some vibrant mid-sized towns, and world-class Boston is fairly accessible, especially if you live in the southeastern corner of New Hampshire.

In addition to its stunning physical beauty, New Hampshire offers one of the most retirement-friendly tax schemes—no personal income, sales, estate, or inheritance taxes levied at the state level.

Situated snugly between Vermont and Maine, close to the U.S./Canada border, the Granite State is home to about 1.3 million people. That makes it a small state, but one with a dizzying array of benefits for new residents of all ages. One of the most remarkable aspects of New Hampshire is its still-vivid history. As one of the first 13 colonies that eventually broke from England to form the United States, New Hampshire’s place in American history is unmistakable.

It’s also an incredibly beautiful state, with breathtaking mountains to dense forests and even a small sliver of Atlantic coastline, all offering quintessentially gorgeous New England views. Choose from tiny villages to busy cities and everything in between.

New Hampshire has no personal income tax, so your pension, retirement account, and Social Security income will not be taxed at that level. You’ll also appreciate the lack of sales, estate, and inheritance tax assessments. However, much of the state is experiencing costs of living that are higher than the national average across the board in all major sectors, from housing to food.

While conditions can and do fluctuate frequently, retirees choosing to move to one of these cities in New Hampshire should be prepared to spend more for the basics and make sure that their retirement savings are sufficient to meet their needs there.

The weather can also be a deterrent for some retirees who are thinking of relocating to New Hampshire. The state gets an average of about 70 inches of snow each year, with average temperatures ranging from about 20 degrees to 80 degrees, depending on the season. If you enjoy seasonable weather and would love witnessing some of the most impressive autumn foliage around, consider the following top cities to retire to in New Hampshire.

Rochester

CITY POPULATION: 32,869

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 18,7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 6.5% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $66,831

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Located right on the border between New Hampshire and Maine, the city of Rochester is one of the fastest growing cities in the state. Part of the Pennacook tribe once called Rochester home, where they grew pumpkins, squash, maize, and beans, as well as hunted and fished for sustenance along the Cocheco River. Today it’s the very vision of a quaint New England town, with an opera house that dates back to the early 20th century and still hosts performances for residents and guests.

Rochester is perfect for retirees who enjoy outdoor activities. You can explore the area beaches at the Grandview Campground, hike the surrounding trails, or fish or swim in the lake there. There’s also a fine art museum, with an impressive contemporary collection to explore, and many folks enjoy the “pick your own” produce at Butternut Farm.

Rochester doesn’t have a lot of hospitals within driving distance, unfortunately; just three are located within 25 miles. On the other hand, it does have a significant community of retirees. You can find nine senior living communities in the area, as well as six assisted living facilities. As for public transportation, Rochester offers bus service and not much more. However, it’s fairly close to Boston, Massachusetts where you can access almost every major form of transportation including three Amtrak stations and a large international airport.

Laconia

CITY POPULATION: 17,025

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 21.9%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 7.5% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $55,814

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Laconia’s jaw-dropping beauty is evident in its open-year-round lakes and beaches. That makes sense, because Laconia is positioned between two lovely lakes, Winnipesaukee and Winnisquam. Whether you’re more interested in fishing, swimming, or just walking along the water’s edge, you’ll love Laconia’s outdoor areas. If you’re more into indoor pursuits, check out the Laconia Antique Center.

Do be aware that the town also hosts an annual motorcycle rally (and has done since the early 20th century), so the ambient noise levels rise significantly every June. Laconia also hosts two sports teams, the New Hampshire Fighting Spirit hockey team and the Winnipesaukee Muskrats baseball team.

Keene

CITY POPULATION: 23,106

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 18,1%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 12.1% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $57,393

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Located in the southern part of the state, Keene is another great choice for those who appreciate and enjoy typical outdoor activities. From hiking to swimming and more, Keene offers a number of nearby facilities, including nature preserves, public parks, and even Green Mountain National Forest. Keene also plays host to an annual music festival for music enthusiasts. You can also people-watch and enjoy the afternoon at Central Square or catch a movie or live performance at the stunning old-school Colonial Theater.

When the family comes to visit, take them to one of the area’s local art galleries or museums. Kids also enjoy Cheshire Children's Museum and, particularly, the working Stonewall Farm. Especially of note to younger visitors are the farm’s animals, including chickens, rabbits, goats, and even draft horses. With such a variety of fun and educational activities, the grandkids will definitely find something to love, and so will you.

Hanover

CITY POPULATION: 11,721

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 15.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 40.5% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $105,446

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

A very small town on the banks of the scenic Connecticut River, right next to the state’s border with Vermont, Hanover offers the laid back, slower pace of life that many retirees crave after decades of a fast-paced career and lifestyle. If you’re dreaming of a tight-knit community with access to top-tier outdoor activities, such as the Appalachian Trail, Hanover might be a good fit for you.

It’s important to note that Hanover has highest cost of living of the towns and cities on our list, according to the most recent available data. However, it’s also an ideal college town, hosting Dartmouth College, a well-known Ivy League school. Enjoy the lovely campus grounds and beautiful historic buildings there. Then visit the Hood Museum of Art, free of charge, or Hopkins Center for the Arts for live performances and movies. Or check out the Nugget Theater, a fun four-screen complex that’s quite popular in the community. Hanover also boasts some wonderful restaurants and cafes, including Jesse’s Steak and Seafood.

Concord

CITY POPULATION: 44,006

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 17.6%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 4.2% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $ 70,004

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

A small city, but larger than most of the other towns on our list, Concord sits in the central southern part of the state, yet is only about an hour’s drive from the Atlantic Ocean. As the capital of New Hampshire, Concord offers an impressive array of activities to keep retirees busy and involved in community life, while still being small enough to offer a small-town vibe.

In season, you can pick apples at Carter Hill Orchard, which has existed in one form or another since the 18th century. Explore the historic home of the 14th U.S. President, Franklin Pierce, and then visit his grave in Old North Cemetery. Don’t miss a visit to the Mc-Aulife-Shepard Discovery Center, honoring two local astronauts, teacher Christa McAuliffe and Alan Shepard, the first American in space.

You’ll enjoy a lower than average cost of living here in Concord, making it one of the more affordable cities in New Hampshire for retirement. as well as access to several top quality medical providers and hospitals.

Portsmouth

CITY POPULATION: 22,277

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 19.4%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 27.6% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $78,712

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Situated at the edge of the Piscataqua River, Portsmouth is a popular and highly walkable spot for tourists and residents alike, especially in the warm, bright summer months. If you’re into history, you can enjoy exploring the town’s historic seaport as well as ten separate museums established in former private homes and mansions.

Fans of the performing arts should keep up with the scheduled performances at The Music Hall, which opened in 1878 and features musical, theatrical, and dance performances, as well as occasional movies. Portsmouth is also home to at least three theatrical groups, as well as the Prescott Park Arts Festival in the town’s waterfront park. Outdoor enthusiasts will always find something to do in Portsmouth, from the area’s beaches (some of which are routinely named as among the cleanest in the country) to many local and state parks that offer fishing, swimming, hiking, and more.

With dozens of hospitals, medical centers, and specialty care clinics in or near Portsmouth, you can be assured of receiving excellent medical care. The closest airport is only two miles from the town, and there’s an Amtrak station in town, so family visits are fairly accessible.

Exeter

CITY POPULATION: 16,114

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 23.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 15% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $73,109

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Founded in 1638, Exeter is positioned in the southern tip of New Hampshire where the Exeter River turns into Squamscott River. It routinely makes the cut in top 30 to 50 lists for best places to retire in the U.S.

Many retirees enjoy the history Exeter showcases for visitors and residents, including the Congregational Church in Exeter, which was founded the same year as the town. Explore the town’s history in more detail through the Exeter Historical Society’s Museum as well as the American Independence Museum, which highlights the area’s role in the American Revolutionary War. If you prefer the great outdoors, check out the fishing at Brickyard Pond Park, which is managed by the town’s Parks and Recreation Department, or play a round of golf at one of the oldest courses in the U.S., the Exeter Country Club. Check out the art exhibits in various media at the Art Up Front Street Studios and Gallery, or sign up for a class in one of the gallery’s workshops. And at the end of a busy day of exploring this charming, quaint town, people of all ages enjoy the halotherapy at Soleil’s Salt Caves.

There are a number of airports within a short distance from Exeter, from Portsmouth Pease (nine miles away) to Boston (43 miles away). In addition, Amtrak’s Downeaster train, which runs from Portland Maine to Boston, stops at Exeter’s platform as the midpoint in the journey. Exeter also boasts plenty of hospitals and medical care centers, as well as a plethora of civic and recreational centers.

Bethlehem

CITY POPULATION: 2,484

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 13.4%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 11.8% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $49,329

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Located in the lovely White Mountains of western New Hampshire, Bethlehem is one of the smaller towns on our list, but its scenery and topography mean it’s one of the most beautiful. What it lacks in some of the more vibrant cultural opportunities of a larger city, it makes up for in its unparalleled scenic beauty and access to outdoor activities. Even so, Bethlehem is home to an active art and music community. The Colonial Theatre showcases independent films, and you’ll find more than one local art gallery that’s friendly to new artists.

The town offers free access to both tennis and basketball courts, and golfers will love the 18-hole Maplewood Golf Course. If winter sports are more your thing, you’ll enjoy Bethlehem’s easy access to snowmobiling trails and cross-country skiing opportunities; with an average of 86 inches of snow a year, you’ll be able to enjoy your favorite activities several days a year. When your family and grandkids come to visit at the holidays, take them to one of the two area holiday tree farms to find and cut down your own live tree. You can also dig into the town’s history through the Bethlehem Heritage Society and its programs.

Berlin

CITY POPULATION: 9,704

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 17.7%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 27.1% below national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $39,091

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Situated along the Androscoggin River and within the Great North Woods Region, Berlin is the northernmost town in New Hampshire and includes the village of Cascade. Don’t be surprised to hear its local residents speak a variation of French, locally referred to as “Berlin French,” as Berlin is quite close to the U.S. border with Canada.

For its relatively small population size, Berlin has a surprisingly diverse set of benefits to offer retirees and their guests. Enjoy Jericho Lake ATV Park or go rafting down the river with experienced guides from North Woods Rafting. You’ll find lots of guide and rental companies to help equip you for a diverse array of White Mountains activities, from snowshoeing to snow tubing and more.

History buffs may appreciate the stunning architecture and art in St. Anne’s, a century-old Roman Catholic church located in downtown Berlin. Another great experience you may enjoy is exploring the Berlin Local Works Farmers’ Market held every Thursday afternoon and evening, including a community garden, demonstration kitchen, and live music performances. Or pick up a class (or volunteer to each one) at Wren Works Maker Studio.

Gilford

CITY POPULATION: 7,804

SHARE OF POPULATION 65+: 20.5%

COST OF LIVING FOR RETIREES: 3% above national average

MEDIAN INCOME: $91,902

TAX RATING FOR RETIREES: Better than national average

Another small town with a coffee-shop vibe that’s relaxing and energetic at the same time, Gilford is a nature lover’s dream. Enjoy a full spectrum of outdoor sports and activities, from summertime swimming and boating to winter skiing and ice fishing. Located on the banks of Lake Winnipesaukee, Gilford is also blessed with a truly spectacular autumnal array of foliage, but never seems overwhelmed with tourists chasing the changing leaves. Enjoy live music performances at the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion, which is an outdoor concert venue that’s open seasonally, weather permitting. An old-fashioned general store and a few historic sites located within Gilford are all worth checking out, as is the Pepi Hermann Crystal Gallery and Museum.

Which City Should You Retire In?

New Hampshire is a state of surprising diversity, though most of the towns that made our list are closer to the small-village end of the size spectrum. For people who are looking for a somewhat more relaxed, laid-back lifestyle with a slower pace, there are a lot of options to consider. The exact location that’s perfect for your needs after retirement will depend a lot on your personal preferences. Do you prefer a slightly larger city vibe? Check out Concord, if so. On the other hand, if you’re more interested in a small village surrounded by mountains and lots of opportunities to get outdoors, take a closer look at Bethlehem. Or if it’s the ocean you crave, you’ll want to explore Portsmouth.

Final Thoughts

Another factor that should weigh heavily in your ultimate decision on where to live during your retirement is your overall retirement plan. What you have saved, in what investment vehicles you’ve placed those savings, and how you anticipate drawing income from those funds will all affect your standard of living and so many decisions about where you can or should move. If you haven’t started creating your retirement plan yet, give us a call so we can create it together.


Share this advice


Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk

Annie Sisk is a freelance writer and content strategist. Originally from North Carolina, Annie now lives in Binghamton, New York. She's written extensively for finance, legal, and human resources sites and publications, including Legal Beagle and Predictive Index.

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Retirable, Inc. ('Retirable') is an SEC registered investment advisor. By using this website, you accept our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. Retirable provides holistic retirement planning services, which are available only to residents of the United States. You must be at least 18 years of age to become a Retirable Premium user. Nothing on this website should be considered an offer, solicitation of an offer, or advice to buy or sell securities.

Investing involves risk and past performance is not indicative of future results. Increased spending increases the risk of depleting your savings and performance is not guaranteed. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any decisions based on your own personal circumstances.

For more information, see our Form ADV Part II and other disclosures.

© 2022 Retirable Inc. All rights reserved.

We're accredited and certified by

Legal

Retirable, Inc. ('Retirable') is an SEC registered investment advisor. By using this website, you accept our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. Retirable provides holistic retirement planning services, which are available only to residents of the United States. You must be at least 18 years of age to become a Retirable Premium user. Nothing on this website should be considered an offer, solicitation of an offer, or advice to buy or sell securities.

Investing involves risk and past performance is not indicative of future results. Increased spending increases the risk of depleting your savings and performance is not guaranteed. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any decisions based on your own personal circumstances.

For more information, see our Form ADV Part II and other disclosures.

© 2022 Retirable Inc. All rights reserved.

We're accredited and certified by